Christians urged to embrace peace as they mark Palm Sunday

March 20, 2016 4:54 pm
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Catholics now enter the Holy Week which will conclude the Lent period of self-denial in preparation for Easter celebrations which begin on Friday, marking the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Photo/MUTHONI WAWERU.
Catholics now enter the Holy Week which will conclude the Lent period of self-denial in preparation for Easter celebrations which begin on Friday, marking the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ. Photo/MUTHONI WAWERU.
NAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 20 – The Christian faithful congregated at various churches across the country to mark the Palm Sunday, an important day in their calendar during which they take time to reflect on the day Jesus Christ made a triumphant entry to Jerusalem ahead of the Easter Holidays.

At the Holy Family Basilica church in Nairobi, the faithful held processions while waving palm fronds which are used as a symbol of reenactment of Christ’s arrival in Jerusalem, days before he was crucified.

“This is a very important day for us as Christians, it is a time to reflect back on that important day when Christ was crucified,” Mary Adala told Capital FM news outside the Holy Family Basilica.

Catholics now enter the Holy Week which will conclude the Lent period of self-denial in preparation for Easter celebrations which begin on Friday, marking the crucifixion and resurrection of Jesus Christ.

For Victor Ogola, a faithful at the All Saints Cathedral church in Nairobi, the significance of Palm Sunday goes beyond monetary value as it is time to support the poor.

“Being able to share with the less fortunate is the epitome of making sacrifices. It’s not always about the money,” he said.

For the Christian faithful, Palm Sunday is the final Sunday of Lent and the beginning of the Holy Week set aside to commemorate the triumphant arrival of Jesus Christ in Jerusalem, days before he was crucified more than 2000 years ago.

“Following his triumphant entry into Jerusalem Christ went on to be crucified and that is why we should use it as an example of strength, courage and hope,” said Magdalene Sewe outside the Anglican Church.

Clerics took the opportunity to preach peace and tolerance, while urging the congregation to always follow the teachings of Christ, as explained by Anglican Archbishop Eliud Wabukala of the All Saints Cathedral who spoke to journalists outside the church.

“Jesus suffered but in that suffering he controlled himself to complete his mission,” he said, as thousands of the faithful carried palm fronds at the ACK main church in Nairobi ready for the day’s sermon.

He emphasized on the need for Kenyans to embrace “peace and exercise self control” while supporting the less fortunate in the society.

“This passion week should teach us the virtue of self control and suffering together and aiming for the good ahead of us,” Wabukala stated.

He also urged leaders to tone down their utterances during public rallies to avoid causing unnecessary conflicts among communities in the country as Kenyans prepare to go to polls in August next year.

“I call on leaders to tone down their political utterances as it could be a recipe for a crisis in the next polls,” he said, while urging Christians to pray for the nation and preach peace and reconciliation.

On corruption, Wabukala said, “It’s everyone’s responsibility to tackle it as we are all affected.”

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