Another Kenyan from Angola has yellow fever

March 17, 2016 6:28 pm
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The man who was working as a shopkeeper in Angola arrived on Saturday through Ethiopia, but it was until Tuesday when he developed symptoms and sought medical attention in Eastleigh/FILE
The man who was working as a shopkeeper in Angola arrived on Saturday through Ethiopia, but it was until Tuesday when he developed symptoms and sought medical attention in Eastleigh/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Mar 17 – Another yellow fever case has been confirmed on a Kenyan who arrived from Angola where he has been staying for more than 10 years.

The man who was working as a shopkeeper in Angola arrived on Saturday through Ethiopia, but it was until Tuesday when he developed symptoms and sought medical attention in Eastleigh.

Acting Director of Medical Services Dr Jackson Kiok told Capital FM News that samples sent to the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) were confirmed on Thursday to contain the acute viral disease.

“It is indeed true that we have confirmed the second case of yellow fever on a man who had been living in Angola for more than 10 years,” Dr Kioko said but assured that the patient was stable.

“Even though it has been confirmed that he has yellow fever, his condition is stable and he will be fine,” he said and urged medical personnel at all the entry points to remain on a high alert.

This brings to two the number of confirmed yellow fever cases after a man who had also arrived from Angola died at the Kenyatta National Hospital.

Health workers were placed on high alert Wednesday for yellow fever, after the Kenyan who had also been living in Angola for a decade died at the Kenyatta National Hospital.

Up to 250 people have died from yellow fever in Angola since late December 2015 when the first case was detected.

Overview

There is no specific treatment for yellow fever, a viral hemorrhagic disease transmitted by infected mosquitoes and found in tropical regions of Africa and Latin America.

Angolan authorities launched a mass vaccination campaign in February.

Luanda remains the worst-hit area, with nine of every 10 deaths registered in the city over the last days.

We don’t have the human resources to cope,” Campos added.

Dr Kioko said health workers at all the airports and other entry points had been placed on high alert to thoroughly screen all passengers arriving from Angola and other countries with yellow fever history.

“We are not taking any chances, and that is why we have advised health workers at the airports and other areas to thoroughly screen passengers and take travel history of anyone from Angola and other countries listed as having an active outbreak by the World Health Organisation (WHO),” he said.

Health workers in all other facilities were directed to take precautions and isolate any patient suspected to have the disease before referring them to hospitals with a capacity to handle such cases.

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