Uganda readies for tense presidential polls, but few doubt winner

February 4, 2016 11:08 am
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Museveni, in power since 1986, will face his stiffest opposition from Kizza Besigye, a three-time loser for the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC), and Amama Mbabazi, a former prime minister and ruling party stalwart now running as an independent/FILE
Museveni, in power since 1986, will face his stiffest opposition from Kizza Besigye, a three-time loser for the Forum for Democratic Change (FDC), and Amama Mbabazi, a former prime minister and ruling party stalwart now running as an independent/FILE
KAMPALA, Uganda, Feb 4 – As the only female presidential candidate in Uganda, a male-dominated country where the leader is eyeing a fourth decade in power, Maureen Kyalya admits the odds are stacked against her.

“He uses force and intimidation,” said Kyalya, describing her former boss, veteran leader Yoweri Museveni, who is seeking re-election on February 18.

Candidates on all sides have raised fears of violence, with accusations of police brutality and recruitment of volunteer police, known as “crime preventers”, as well as claims opposition groups are organising militia forces.

“He’s trained people he calls ‘crime preventers’, but their job is to beat everybody senseless to scare them that there’s going to be war, so they vote for him,” Kyalya said.

Government spokesman Ofwono Opondo on Monday issued fresh warnings that opposition parties were organising militia gangs and planning to erect road blocks on main roads to “paralyse economic activities” and to “attack several offices of the Electoral Commission”.

On Tuesday, former intelligence chief General David Sejusa, an outspoken critic of Museveni, was charged with taking part in politics against army law and remanded in custody.

With three weeks to go, campaigning is in full swing, but few analysts expect the seven opposition candidates will end Museveni’s 30-year rule.

Kyalya is brutally honest about her chances.

“I know that no matter how hard I try, I’m not actually going to get anywhere,” she told AFP, accusing Museveni of having rigged past polls.

Still, Kyalya, a 41-year-old former presidential aide, said she feels compelled to try, and insists Uganda is ready for a female president.

“Martin Luther King said the worst thing a great man can do, is do nothing,” she said.

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