EACC summons Raila to explain Eurobond claims

December 8, 2015 12:22 pm
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An EACC official told Capital FM News that they had already dispatched a letter asking the former Prime Minister to present himself this Thursday at the commission's offices in Nairobi/FILE
An EACC official told Capital FM News that they had already dispatched a letter asking the former Prime Minister to present himself this Thursday at the commission’s offices in Nairobi/FILE

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Dec 8 – CORD leader Raila Odinga has been summoned by the Ethics and Anti-Corruption Commission (EACC) to provide more information on the controversy surrounding the Eurobond cash, which he claims was misappropriated.

An EACC official told Capital FM News that they had already dispatched a letter asking the former Prime Minister to present himself this Thursday at the commission’s offices in Nairobi.

“The letter was already sent to him and we expect him here on Thursday,” the official said.

EACC detectives investigating the matter have already questioned Treasury Cabinet Secretary Henry Rotich and Principal Secretary Kamau Thugge, seeking to establish how the Sh250 billion was spent.

While the two have stated that the money was spent prudently, Odinga insists that the government is unable to account for Sh140 billion.

Odinga and other CORD politicians – including Ford Kenya’s Moses Wetangula – have demanded the sacking of Rotich and Thugge, declaring “the time for sideshows is over”.

The former premier last week turned down an invitation from the Treasury to go and scrutinise documents on how the money was spent.

Odinga’s claims have angered many top government officials, with Deputy President William Ruto saying he is out to sabotage the economy by scaring away investors.

Economist David Ndii at the weekend published an extensive analysis of the Eurobond, outlining what he termed as glaring anomalies contained in a statement issued by the Treasury soon after Odinga questioned how the money was spent.

Ndii’s figures have been disputed by the Treasury technocrats who described them as “confusing”.

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