Hurricane strands tourists, sparks looting in Mexico

September 16, 2014 8:35 am


People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo after Hurricane Odile/AFP
People loot a supermarket in San Jose del Cabo after Hurricane Odile/AFP
Mexico, Sept 16 – Hurricane Odile destroyed homes and shut down airports in Mexico’s Baja California peninsula, sparking looting, marooning thousands of foreign tourists and injuring 135 people.

The powerful storm caused heavy material damage in Los Cabos resort towns and hotels were badly flooded. Nobody was killed.

Hundreds of looters on Monday ransacked supermarkets and electronic stores, snatching rice, water, toilet paper, alcohol, televisions, and fans after the passage of the hurricane, which later weakened as it moved north.

More than 1,000 troops were deployed to the disaster area, which was without electricity and running water. Scores of wood-plank and tin-roof homes were leveled in one neighborhood.

“I’m taking water for the children and food for the baby. You never know what can happen tomorrow,” Osvaldo Lopez, 41, said as he left a convenience store.

Some 26,000 foreigners and 4,000 Mexican beachgoers were looking at a second night in hotels that served as temporary shelters.

Authorities scrambled to reopen the international airports in Los Cabos and La Paz in order to send military planes to airlift the tourists.

But National Civil Protection coordinator Luis Felipe Puente said the first planes would only leave Tuesday because of the damage caused by strong winds at the terminals.

“We don’t have optimal conditions to begin flights in the next few hours,” he told a news conference, adding that sick tourists and the elderly would be airlifted first.

The hurricane smashed hotel windows, flooded rooms and sent palm trees flying into swimming pools.

“I’m disappointed about my vacation, but above all my heart aches for the people from here who lost everything,” said Tifani Brown, a 34-year-old American tourist who had only arrived Sunday — the day the hurricane hit — from California.

“It’s one thing to see hurricanes on TV. It’s another to live them,” she said.

Some tourists said they spent the night at the Los Cabos airport’s luggage room after flights were canceled on Sunday. They were now looking at a night in a hotel near the airport.

“When the hurricane hit, the light went out in the airport, windows shattered, the ceiling fell and some computers exploded,” said Mariana Perez, a 26-year-old Mexican engineer, showing a video of it on her phone.

Odile crashed ashore as a category three hurricane in the five-scale Saffir-Simpson scale, packing winds of 205 kilometers (125 miles) an hour.

It weakened to category one on Monday as winds slowed to 120 kilometers an hour and was later downgraded to a tropical storm, the US National Hurricane Center said.

While 11,000 local residents took refuge in schools and other temporary shelters, some braved the storm in their humble houses.

Soledad Mayo, 52, sent four of her children to a neighbor’s home while she stayed in her wooden house with her husband.

“We spent the night standing there, waiting to see what would be left of our house. But look, it took everything,” she said, surrounded by rubble.

The hurricane hit the Pacific coast around the one-year anniversary of a twin tropical storm battering on both coasts that left 157 people dead.


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