Action sought after Moyale rights defender was executed

According to the activists, military officers shot and killed the human rights defender Hassan Guyo at a security check that they had mounted/FILE

According to the activists, military officers shot and killed the human rights defender Hassan Guyo at a security check that they had mounted/FILE

NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug 16 – A group of eight civil society organisations have demanded the suspension of the Police and Military Commanders behind a security operation in Moyale County on August 7, which left a human rights activist dead.

The group argues that all the security units who were on duty on the fatal day must be probed because it is not clear why the military had been deployed for a police task.

According to the activists, military officers shot and killed the human rights defender Hassan Guyo at a security check that they had mounted.

Kenya Human Rights Commission Deputy Executive Director Davis Malombe also urged the Inspector General of Police and the Director of Public Prosecutions to investigate the circumstances under which live ammunition was used against unarmed civilians.

“The Cabinet Secretary for Defence should also clarify the circumstances under which the army was deployed in Moyale and whether parliamentary approval was sought pursuant to Article 241 (3) (c) of the Constitution,” he argued.

The civil societies further accused security agents in the country of extra judicial killings, noting that the 40-year-old Guyo was shot on the back right after obeying directives from the military officers.

Independent Medico Legal Unit Executive Director Peter Kiama claimed that the officers also attacked a Red Cross official who rushed to Guyo’s aid.

“No one was allowed near Guyo including the Red Cross official until around 6:15pm when army men drove off and locals found that he was dead. His body was collected at around 6:30pm by police,” explained Kiama.

Reports show that Guyo was being ferried on a motorcycle when he and the rider came across a security barricade before being ordered to turn back.

But there was also a taxi that was backing up after being ordered to do so by the same military officers.

As the motorcycle rider was turning back, Guyo alighted to make it easier to back up but as he turned to board, he was shot.

“At that time army officers were shouting at them and Guyo raised his arms to indicate he was not armed and as a sign of surrender but as he turned, he was shot and fell down,” explained Kamau Ngugi of the National Coalition of Human Rights.

Kiama further accused security personnel of executing individuals in the name of combating crime, adding that civil society personnel would keep vigil in Moyale County in a week’s time to honor their fallen colleague.

“We have observed a trend where police seem to shoot to kill at every moment and there’s a clear narrative coming out; that every time police confront suspects, the suspects are armed and deserve to die,” argued Kiama.