Govt tightens Global Fund check list

February 24, 2009 12:00 am

, NAIROBI, Kenya, Feb 24 – The government has established a new monitoring structure to manage the multi-billion shilling Global Fund, following demands of accountability from financiers amid threats of withdrawal.

Medical Services Permanent Secretary James ole Kiyiapi announced on Tuesday that the government had disbanded the traditional Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) and instead instituted three coordinating units to specifically oversee Malaria, Tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS interventions.

“We have completely dismantled the old system that was creating a lot of bureaucracy and confusion,” Prof Kiyiapi said.

In the new structure, the management of tuberculosis and malaria drugs will be under the Ministry of Public Health, while HIV/AIDS grants will be coordinated by the National Aids Control Council (NACC).

NACC will then distribute the funds to the Ministry of Medical Services, Ministry of Public Health, civil society and the private sector.

“We will also ensure that there is an oversight committee comprised of the PS’ of Finance, Public Health, Medical Services and Special Programs together with the key strategic partners, including the private sector and the civil society,” Prof Kiyiapi added.
The proposal will be presented to a delegation of the Global Fund officials expected in the country next month.

Prof Kiyiapi’s comments followed concerns raised by his Minister Anyang’ Nyong’o that the country could run out of malaria drugs within six months due to lack of funding.
“We have a pipeline of resources that have been approved by the Global Fund but they want us to put in place some measures in terms of how we manage the resources,” the PS assured.

“Of course if we fail to satisfy them we could run out of drugs in the next six months, unless Treasury is ready to finance us.”

The Global Fund secretariat withheld funding for the three killer diseases late last year over claims of misappropriation and corruption.

The government has heightened attempts to save face including establishing a committee to probe the misappropriation, but its findings are yet to be made public.


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