7 Things no one tells you about cross-cultural relationships

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By Joan Thatiah for MumsVillage

 

CROSS-CULTURAL RELATIONSHIPS ARE NOTHING NEW IN OUR SOCIETY. GONE ARE THE DAYS WHEN AUTOMATICALLY ONE GOT MARRIED TO A SPOUSE FROM THE SAME COMMUNITY OR TRIBE. CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ADD SPICE TO A RELATIONSHIP.

However, they can also bring about some unique challenges. Here is how to navigate such hiccups like a pro:

1. Say it – We all have preconceived notions regarding other cultures and races. Just because your significant other sees beyond them does not mean that all his peers will. This is an observation by Caroline, an American who has been married to Kirui, a Kenyan for six years. She says that her biggest challenge at the beginning was offensive remarks made by his friends.

“Each time I felt offended, I talked to him about it and he would deal with it,” she says. This stopped her from getting resentful. Over the years, she has heard many remarks about the colour of her skin but she says she learnt not to quickly take offence.

2. You may have to learn their language – “When he took me home the first time, I kept asking myself how I could prove myself to be a worthy daughter-in-law to his family if we couldn’t even understand each other,” Caroline says.

She imagined that it was enough that the two of them could communicate. When she met the rest of his family who mostly spoke their mother tongue, she often felt alienated. Sometimes she even feared that they were speaking about her. Now, with a lot of patience, she has learnt conversational Kalenjin, a big compromise she had never anticipated.

3. The Homesickness – Cross-cultural marriages sometimes involve one party relocating to the home country of their beloved. If you make the move, you will definitely feel homesick. To counter this, keep in touch with relatives and friends, but also focus on putting down roots and building strong networks of friends in your new home.

“MY HUSBAND HAS BEEN VERY SUPPORTIVE AND UNDERSTANDING ESPECIALLY DURING THE HOLIDAYS. HE HAS ALSO ENCOURAGED ME TO FORGE FRIENDSHIPS WITH A FEW AMERICAN WOMEN LIVING IN NAIROBI,” CAROLINE SAYS.

4. Assume Nothing – Your culture and upbringing has conditioned you to think in a particular way. Your undying love and acceptance of your partner will not automatically change all this. When she met her Asian husband, Anita, a 28-year-old woman born and raised in Kitui promised herself that she would be accommodating of his religion. She is a Christian while he is Muslim. The intensity of their differences hit home when they found themselves having fights about minor issues like what food to cook. She smiles,“Some of these differences do not go away. You will just have to handle each misunderstanding as it comes.”

5. Leaning in – Nyokabi, 33, grew up hearing how all successful couples had a close circle of friends and family that helped them stay together. Then she married a man from a Western Kenya and realised that most of those close to them were unsupportive. “The realisation that we only had each other was a game-changer. We stopped fighting each other and started fighting to stay together,” she says.

CONTINUE READING HERE

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