Real heros to miss Aug 27 Kenya fete

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PAUL AMINA

Once again,  Kenyans will congregate at the Uhuru Park Grounds, Central Nairobi to celebrate yet  another  great event only reminiscent and comparable to the independence of  the country from Britain in 1963.  A new Constitution whose delivery has been elusive and controversial for 47 years will be born on August 27, 2010.

Though welcomed by many, there are some who may not heartily join the rest at the promulgation of the first Kenyan Constitution by President Mwai Kibaki. The heroes of the second liberation struggle are unwelcome local guests at the fete that bears some negative remarkable similarities to the independence celebrations. Mau Mau freedom fighters against the white colonial rule were conspicuously absent at the independence celebrations at the Uhuru Gardens in 1963 yet that was their effort.

Whether the exclusion of these post-independence heroes is deliberate or not, is everybody\’s guess. Present day Kenyan leaders are not to blame for the neglect.  They are following in the footsteps of their predecessors who were  in the habit of doing so and the exclusion of this lot is not an accident neither an exception. 

Former UN Secretary General, Kofi Annan, former Tanzanian  President, Benjamin William Mkapa and Graca Machel, key  mediators  in the electoral dispute  over the  premature  presidential results tallies will  be  among  foreign dignitaries to grace the event  in which the Cabinet and other constitutional office holders will take fresh oaths of office.

Under Annan\’s  chairmanship,  post election  violence negotiators  concurred  that the delivery of a new Constitution  was a priority in healing  the wounded nation and reconciling communities  and that it had to be done  before the lapse of  the controversial Coalition government term.  Parliament enacted a law to constitute a Committee of Experts (CoE) to harmonise the Bomas  and other  drafts  before necessary amendments  were made  by the  Parliamentary Committee on the  Constitution (PSC).

There  are those unsung  heroes and heroines   who paid  dearly with their blood and freedoms to remind the leadership of  the  footnote  at the Lancaster House  Order in Council  that  from  December  12, 1963,  Kenyans  were  authorised to make  their  own Constitution. The Kenyan leadership that has been bent on distorting history could not tolerate critics and opposition by lesser mortals.

A fresh war of words erupted between the establishment and progressive forces fighting for change   and an end to the imperial presidency.  The intolerant regime ensured that the seeds of reform were not allowed to germinate. In the ensuing years, prisons were filled to the brim by the so-called dissidents  and government critics.

The initiatives of these brave sons and daughters of Kenya have paid dividends. At last, Kenyans have a Constitution even if the beneficiaries of that sweat and blood are not willing to invite the heroes to the fete or mention their efforts in official speeches.  

Organizations also played a role in one way or another in ensuring that change becomes a reality before we celebrate the 50th independence anniversary. The National Labour Centre and its affiliates mobilized  the  labour movement  in the campaign for the enactment of the  new  law failing which  the  centre was ready to give Kenyans their own version  of the new Constitution.

Central Organisation of Trade Unions (COTU) secretary general, Francis Atwoli said that history was repeating itself in Kenya.  If it were not for the complimentary struggle waged by the trade union movement to the Mau Mau insurgency, Kenya could not have attained independence that soon.   For some time, the leadership has taken the labour movement for granted.

In  Kenya, there are leaders  who believe that  freedom fighters  and  other  heroes  don\’t  deserve recognition  or compensation for the wrongs against  them. One such person is none other the Attorney General, Amos Wako whose docket handles human rights violations and related injustices in the law courts.

The one  time acclaimed human rights lawyer had the guts to appeal  against  token  compensation  for  the atrocities inflicted  on  the  Nyayo torture chamber victims by  State agents. Wako doesn\’t believe that the beneficiaries of this token deserve the award in their graves, sick beds and poor settlements.

For recognition, second liberation fighters have to wait for a much longer time like Dedan Kimathi in the unmarked grave at the Kamiti Maximum Prison.  He was honoured posthumously with a Sh4 million statue while his family languishes in poverty.

(Paul Amina is a freelance Journalist and former political prisoner. Email [email protected])

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  • suguta

    Mpango wa kando should be encouraged by civilized sexually people hence this is the highest enjoyment of modern life. what is (where) can one find happiness in the universe? No woman tastes like the other!that’s why mpango wa kando must be enjoyed by both sexes,couples and perhaps this will help eliminating inheritance deseases like Cancer, diabetes etc which according to scientists can orinate from families dna? The only problem with mpango wa kando is if one is

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