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Kenyan & 3 Other African Innovators Recognized For Their Work

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Three young African entrepreneurs have won the King Baudouin African Development Prize Award. This took place on 20th June 2017 in the presence of King Philippe and Queen Mathilde of Belgium at the Royal Palace in Brussels. This comes after a young innovative Ugandan got the chance to train at the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) research center in Silicon Valley.

Leonard Alvin Kabwama from Uganda got the chance to train at NASA for his radiation-based urine diagnostic test. He will undergo an intensive 8-week product design and development training at the Singularity University. The Makerere University graduate is known for other innovations including a bomb detection robot he built. He is also a co-founder of Innovex, a leading technology company in Uganda.

Other Africans that are putting the continent on the global map of technology are Tonee Ndung’u (Kenya), Gerald Abila(Uganda) and Alloysius Attah(Ghana) who won the coveted King Baudouin African Development Prize Awards. Tonee’s innovation is Kytabu which is an app that leases textbook content to students across the country. This has helped fight illiteracy in the country. Tonee talked about education and said,“Quality education is at the heart of human development. Many students miss out and are held back because they cannot afford books that are curriculum required. Our app changes that. We are the alternative to textbooks. It is solutions like this that will transform our communities and enable people to build more prosperous lives. We are proud to be a part of a new wave of development across the continent and looking forward to developing the platform further through the Prize.”

 

BarefootLaw which is an online law company owned by Gerald Abila, offers free legal services to Ugandans living in rural areas. Alloysius Attah’s company, Farmerline which got him the award, is an agricultural based start-up . It aims at helping small-scale farmers make money. Alloysius had also been named in Forbes’ “30 under 30” 2017 list.

The King Baudouin African Development Prize focuses on socially-minded entrepreneurs and that is one of the basis that the three start-ups won. The award was founded in 2012. Each of the winner gets a €75,000 prize money and assistance form key stakeholders.  We wish other young African entrepreneurs all the best as they continue breaking barriers and achieving international awards for their work.

 

This article was written by Capital Campus Correspondent  Anthony Mbugua.

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