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DK Kwenye Beat’s Interview On The Trend Was A Total Disaster

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DK Kwenye Beat, I have been a big fan of your music ever since you released your first project titled Naangalia Juu. Of all your projects, Furi Furi is probably my favorite. You are talented. You have a great potential. But please stop with the unnecessary bravado and buffoonery.

I’ve heard with pain your fall from grace to grass. As a man who believes in seasons, I know that you can always rise above your challenges. Whatever goes up, must come down. I know that you are trying to make a comeback which you desperately need so I will advise you with the hope that you actually achieve your goals. because you are doing it in the worst possible way.

Your current strategy only has one ending, deep in the bins of forgetfulness.

You do not need to embarrass yourself on prime TV to get the much-needed comeback. While you will be quick to remind me that you are in showbiz, I will tell you that showbiz and folly are two different things.

I couldn’t watch the interview past the 1st minute. Not because you had no content, but because your attitude was repulsively awful. Your body language was reeking of arrogance. The way you were swinging on that interview chair was off. You took away the much-needed attention from your project by diverting it to your shenanigans. You blew off prime TV airtime just like that. You were handed what many artists dream of; to be exposed to millions who watch the Trend and yet you blew it.

You are a musician with a dwindling career & the only strategy you could come up with to revive it is to acquire a terrible ‘weng,’ cheap grills and a protruded midsection.

While in the past you have ridden on controversy to sell your brand, I don’t think that the strategy worked well for you. For the last two years, we haven’t heard any impactful project from you. Your 2016 projects are struggling to gain views on YouTube. One actually has over 70k views. This is average for a musician of your calibre.

Using controversy can take you to a certain level of success, talent is indispensable. Hard work and discipline beats talent. Work on a strategy that is sustainable. Having been on a long hiatus only for you to come back looking like a teenager who suffers from identity crisis is to insult your fans.

Maybe you are a disciple of the philosophy ‘there is no bad or good publicity’ that is clearly open to question. For someone who is building a brand that sells hope, faith, Jesus and the good news, surely, you shouldn’t be pursuing notoriety and a  scandalous reputation.

The gospel industry is one. Your actions, or of any other player in the industry, though individual, might indirectly lead to the growth of apathy towards the content they produce. Remember that one bad apple spoils the (whole) barrel.

Hebrews 12:1, “Therefore, since we are surrounded by such a great cloud of witnesses, let us throw off everything that hinders and the sin that so easily entangles. And let us run with perseverance the race marked out for us.”

Maybe you didn’t like the project you launched on TV or maybe you were not ready. In that case, the honourable thing you should have done was to postpone the interview instead of wasting your audience’s time. You released floods of folly. We can’t recover the brain cells we lost during the time we were watching that unfortunate interview. We now have to dedicate time to consume proper content so that we can wash off the terrible taste you left in our mouth.

Your attempts at being funny fell flat off.

What’s with the accent that made you sound like a frog with flu?

What manner of CHEAP substance did you get intoxicated on before you went on TV?

OMG, I now agree that folly is expensive.

My brother, before you embarrass yourself any further, I would advise you to drop the annoying fake accent, coated metals and pick up a book.

Because what you did prove is that everyone should make knowledge & wisdom their close companions.

Corporate deals are not signed by being a buffoon on TV. You have to be smart. You have to be authentic. Your skill of business must be sharper than a Samurai’s sword. Because this industry is flooded. To gain an upper hand over the competition, your craft, diligence, strategy etc must be above the competition.

In case you are doubting me, ask Juliani what turned him into a corporate savvy musician who bags deals left right and centre. Talk to King kaka about what it takes to be a top dog in an industry flooded by rappers. Invite Bahati for a cup of coffee and dig wisdom that has made him who he is today.

Maybe you will have a chance to do a proper comeback and salvage whatever is left of your career.

This article was first published on Dannish.co.ke. Follow the writer on twitter @dannishodongo.

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Dannish Odongo
Dannish Odongo gets satisfaction in telling stories. He strives to be an all rounded writer but with main focus in Development Journalism, Lifestyle and Human Interest stories across Africa. He is an avid reader of African literature and a die hard fan of history. Recently, he discovered his wannabe motor journalism side and he hopes to build it up. He is a graduate of Commerce in Daystar University in Kenya. He is currently pursuing a masters degree in Media studies in the same University.
http://dannish.co.ke