Nokia introduces translator on Lumia range

June 24, 2013
Shares

,

The app, Bing Translator, enables users to get automatic translations of text by pointing the phone's camera at the intended text/FILE
The app, Bing Translator, enables users to get automatic translations of text by pointing the phone’s camera at the intended text/FILE
NAIROBI, Kenya Jun 24 – Nokia has introduced a multi-language translator that works via text and voice on its Lumia range of smartphones.

The app, Bing Translator, enables users to get automatic translations of text by pointing the phone’s camera at the intended text.

The user points the camera towards what they want to translate, and see the translation instantly.

Bing Translator is a free service for text and voice and currently translates over 32 languages including Arabic, English, Spanish, French, Japanese, German and Chinese among others.

Nokia’s Head of Product Marketing for East Africa, King’ori Gitahi, said the app will enable users overcome language barriers, especially when travelling to a foreign country.

“When you’re looking at a menu, or a sign at a train station or airport in a foreign country, trying to interpret the unusual letters and words can often lead to stress and confusion. Using the camera option in this app will turn your camera’s viewfinder into a translation tool. It scans the text placed in front of it and swaps the words for ones that you’re more familiar with,” Gitahi said.

He said that Bing Translator app is a personal assistant when it comes to understanding what’s being said, or what’s on a menu.

“Gone are the days of staring blankly at the menu in a foreign restaurant and relying on the pictures for reassurance,” he added.

He explained that In order for the translations to happen, users would require an Internet connection but at the same time, the translator has the ability to download language packs for a number of countries, so users are advised to download these before they leave their native country.

The app also has voice functionality as it’s able to translate spoken word, but this is subject to Internet connection.

If you need to ask somebody where the nearest public toilet is, for example, just say it into the phone and you’ll be presented with a written version along with a speaker icon.

When pressed, this will read out your translated phrase in the language you’ve selected.

The free app works both in an online and offline mode and is now available on the windows phone store.

Shares

Latest Articles

Stock Market

Most Viewed